Incoming: Megabox

Concept art for Megabox sent through @KimDotcom’s twitter feed on 06/21/2012.

Way back in December of 2011, Megaupload founder, admitted embezzeler and insider trading enthusiast, Kim Schmitz, aka Kim Dotcom [legally changed in 2005], announced a streaming music service called Megabox.  It was going to be “a cloud-based music locker, download store, and do-it-yourself artist service.”  The idea was to put artists first, consumers second and distribution third on scales of importance.

Not a terrible idea in my opinion.

Well, if you don’t know already: Megabox stalled when New Zealand authorities [in cooperation with the U.S.] raided his home and placed him in custody under the charges of criminal copyright infringement in relation to his Megaupload Web site.  Back in February, he was released on bond but restricted to the 80km around his palatial estate [“Whaah, I can’t go 50 miles away from my PALATIAL estate!”]  His wikipedia page says that he was also barred from using the internet, but obviously that’s been rescinded.  He’s launched a new twitter account.

Although I do have misgivings about the dude after reading the details of  his misadventures in business [and that’s coming from a guy with a subversive website.]  I’m all about shaking up status quo, but this character’s a major…entrepreneur and I’m just wondering if file-sharing is his latest…hobby topic.   Yes.  That’s what we’ll call it.  Regardless, he’s got a great idea and I’ve always been an idea guy and will be there opening service day.

Read more over at torrentfreak who broke this story earlier today!

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Should the UMG-EMI music label merger be stopped?

UMG-EMI mergerI just received a petition from http://publicknowledge.org  to stop this merger that’s been making some press for at least the last month.  After reading the associated article, I knee-jerked and signed a petition.  Note to self: Stop jerking off so much.  You see, I may have just contradicted my principles and views on high level mergers.

Digital distribution of music is the future of music.  The CD is dead.  New platforms are being developed to compete with iTunes’ dominance of the market and a merger at this level will make competition all the more difficult for start-ups with little entry-capital; this hypothetical combined label will be able to set the barrier to entry at whatever level they see fit.  But on the flip-side a merger at this level may be a financial necessity to keep the two operating.  This brings up another point entirely:  Do they need to operate?

Even more alarming is that if the merger is approved UMG-EMI would control 40% of the music industry.

Great business move.

Now that I’ve thought about it, I remember that I was all for Sirius and XM to merge back in 2007 because I was aware both were struggling to stay afloat and could not survive as two separate companies and I desperately wanted at least Sirius to survive [I’m a huge Howard Stern fan.]  Well, it appears that the music industry is not what it was ten or even fifteen years ago due to lack of album sales [Go ahead, blame me.  Send hate mail to idtorrentthat@gmail.com!] and they may be in the same boat as Sirius and XM back when they were separate.  Keep in mind Sirius-XM is now combined and doing terribly.  Just take a look at their stock.  Suffice it to say maybe they have a point.  Or maybe they just need to go away and let the music industry reform itself.

Read more on this topic from Glenn Peoples on billboard.biz after the jump!

My first music purchase in over a decade. Wha-?!

I’m not a monster.  I have a heart…and a brain. [Big reveal.]  Life and Music (at least the popular versions of both) have sucked for as far back as I can remember.  Like, way back to when this was all there was to look at.

 

I can fall asleep at my keyboard describing to you in detail what’s wrong with you if you’ve enjoyed the millenium in music so far; go buy some Nickelback tickets for chrisakes.

“Douche-chills” comes to mind.

Sure I’ve marveled at the spectacle of acts like Lady Gaga and even tapped my feet to a Beyonce remix.

They kick you out of the gay bar if you don’t do exactly this every time “All the Single Ladies” plays.

But nothing’s gotten through my shell; nothing’s charmed me to the point where my lizard brain stops the auto-torrent command signal  by order of the higher ape brain and instead checks on a legit digital download.  That is, until yesterday.  I’m thinking it may be an embolism thing, but arterial blood-flow be damned.  I spent $6 on a fucking Pomplamoose download!  The video is charming…or dark magic.

If the image above is moving, get out of the house now!

Oh, hey!  Since yesterday (when this entry was just a wee draft) Pomplamoose released a new single!

Link to the free mp3 here.

Format Wars: Sean Parker and Daniel Ek on Apple, Playlists and the End of the CD: The D10 Highlights (Video)

“The CD is dead and gone. The playlist is the new CD.”

link to video

Below is an excerpt from a recent post on the mysterious business model Spotify is using to rope artists in for pennies on the dollar by  Bob Lefsetz

Spotify Transparency

There is none.

In Singapore, I interviewed Ken Parks, majordomo of Spotify’s U.S. operation. I told him I would ask tough questions. That I had to, everybody already thinks I’m on the Spotify payroll, I just couldn’t let him do a commercial. He said this was all cool.

And then didn’t answer a single question I had, certainly not any that probed into the inner workings of the service. Not that I was interrogating him. But why exactly did you have to sign in with Facebook? Ken said everybody liked that, he got no complaints. He did admit that search was flawed. But I still can’t understand why it works so well in iTunes and so poorly in Spotify. If I don’t find something in Spotify, I change the search terms and suddenly whole albums appear. I’m not a techie, why does Apple do it so much better, is it really that hard, hell, Spotify’s been around for years. And then I brought up the obvious point, the one I’m inundated with, the small payments.

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